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Gao Xingjian Summary

Everything you need to understand or teach Gao Xingjian.

  • 20 Literature Criticism

Study Pack

The Gao Xingjian Study Pack contains about 135 pages of study material in 20 products, including:

Essays & Analysis (20)

8,390 words, approx. 28 pages
In the following essay, Chen discusses Wildman in terms of both Western and Chinese cultural influences. In May 1985, when Gao Xingjian premiered his third play, Wildman, in Beijing, China, its critic... Read more
1,230 words, approx. 5 pages
In the following essay, Williams contends that the Swedish Academy's Nobel Prize committee has a conflict of interest that puts into question the validity of Gao's winning of the Nobel P... Read more
735 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following essay, Ruark assesses the publishing history of Gao's works in English translation. Hard to Get American readers looking for books by Gao Xingjian, this year's Nobel lau... Read more
981 words, approx. 4 pages
In the following review, Levi examines the experimental narrative voice in Soul Mountain. In its occasionally quixotic battle for universalism, the Swedish Academy often awards the Nobel Prize for lit... Read more
4,125 words, approx. 14 pages
In the following essay, Lin offers an overview of Gao's works to Western readers unfamiliar with his oeuvre, focusing on the theme of individual versus collective rights and responsibilities in... Read more
6,013 words, approx. 21 pages
In the following essay, Haiping discusses the theme of posthumanism and the individual in Gao's dramatic works. Chinese drama since the late 1970s, like other forms of art and literature of the... Read more
492 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following review, Wu explores Gao's narrative voice and the theme of the collective search for the meaning of life in Soul Mountain. Gao Xingjian was diagnosed with lung cancer in 1982. ... Read more
1,737 words, approx. 6 pages
In the following interview, Gao and Lee, the English-language translator of Soul Mountain, discusses the theme of love and male-female relationships in Gao's body of work. There ought to be a N... Read more
1,528 words, approx. 6 pages
In the following essay, Mehegan asserts that Gao acts as a spokesperson for individual freedoms through his works of drama and fiction. Standing alone at the podium, a slender Chinese man in a black s... Read more
787 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following review, Jenner argues that Soul Mountain is a book about a male mid-life crisis and criticizes the English translation of the novel, noting the “clumsiness of expression in vir... Read more
356 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following review, Twitchell-Waas asserts that the primary achievement of Soul Mountain is Gao's experimental use of narrative voice throughout the novel. Although last year Gao Xingjian ... Read more
5,736 words, approx. 20 pages
In the following essay, Kuoshu compares Bus Stop to Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot, and explores the motif of waiting in both plays in terms of their different cultural contexts. The Bus-St... Read more
269 words, approx. 1 pages
In the following review, the critic contends that Gao's narrative structure in Soul Mountain requires patience on the part of the reader and that the novel may not hold the attention of readers... Read more
3,411 words, approx. 12 pages
In the following essay, Burckhardt discusses Gao's plays in terms of the theme of self-exploration and the search for individual identity. Occasionally there is an individual who has the courag... Read more
641 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following review, Burckhardt examines Gao's experimental use of narrative voice in Soul Mountain. Lingshan (soul-mountain) is a quasi-mythological place “where wonderful things ca... Read more
541 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following review of The Other Shore, a collection of Gao's plays in English translation, Goldblatt praises the introduction and the translation of the works by Gilbert Fong. Gao Xingjian... Read more
537 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following essay, Beyette and Johnson discuss the significance of Gao being awarded the Nobel Prize to the international recognition of Chinese literature. No one was more thrilled on hearing th... Read more
828 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following essay, Dahlburg provides an overview of Gao's literary career in terms of his controversial reception by the Chinese government. After nearly a century of existence, the Nobel ... Read more
911 words, approx. 4 pages
In the following essay, Kuhn explores the response of Chinese government officials, writers, and literary scholars to Gao's winning of the Nobel Prize in Literature. For the many Chinese who ha... Read more
1,112 words, approx. 4 pages
In the following essay, Lovell evaluates the significance of Gao's winning of the Nobel Prize in Literature to his status as a self-exiled dissident Chinese writer and to Western conceptions of... Read more
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