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Cyberpunk Summary

Everything you need to understand or teach Cyberpunk.

  • 1 Student Essay
  • 31 Literature Criticism
  • ...and more

Study Pack

The Cyberpunk Study Pack contains about 739 pages of study material in 32 products, including:

Essays & Analysis (32)

4,178 words, approx. 14 pages
In the following essay, Fekete reviews the volume Storming the Reality Studio: A Casebook of Cyberpunk and Postmodern Science Fiction, providing a brief overview of the cyberpunk movement. We see thro... Read more
3,915 words, approx. 14 pages
In the following essay, Olsen examines the increasing conservatism and mainstream acceptance of cyberpunk and postmodernism. The 1980s may have marked the beginning of the end of postmodernism—... Read more
4,985 words, approx. 17 pages
In the following essay, Crossley provides a survey of futuristic science fiction works and reviews several works that critically examine science fiction and cyberpunk. The future has been a viable loc... Read more
3,061 words, approx. 11 pages
In the following essay, Latham reviews Fiction 2000: Cyberpunk and the Future of Narrative, finding the volume narrow in scope and lacking in substance. In the informal interview that closes Fiction 2... Read more
8,226 words, approx. 28 pages
In the following essay, Nixon questions the feminism of cyberpunk. In the 1970s feminist writers made successful intrusions into the genre of the popular SF novel, a genre whose readership, then and n... Read more
12,029 words, approx. 41 pages
In the following essay, Balsamo examines the effects of techo-culture on women and the feminist implications of cyberpunk. All we ever want (ever wanted) was to be on that mailing list. —Ron S... Read more
7,973 words, approx. 27 pages
In the following essay, Cadora contrasts early, male-dominated, cyberpunk with the later wave of the movement led by feminists. Rumor has it that cyberpunk is dead, the victim of its own failure to li... Read more
11,273 words, approx. 38 pages
In the following essay, Harper presents an overview of feminist cyberpunk criticism and argues that feminist cyborg literature is the seminal movement in a changing sociopolitical worldview. Somewhere... Read more
6,185 words, approx. 21 pages
In the following essay, Curl explains the historical metaphors of science that led to the development of science fiction and cyberpunk. Science is not generally considered metaphoric. Rather, metaphor... Read more
10,839 words, approx. 37 pages
In the following essay, Davis analyzes the place of historical gnosticism and allegory in cyberpunk fiction. One of the most compelling snares is the use of the term metaphor to describe a corresponde... Read more
8,974 words, approx. 30 pages
In the following essay, Sussman discusses the cyberpunk reinterpretation of Victorian history in The Difference Engine. Taking responsibility for the social relations of science and technology means r... Read more
4,971 words, approx. 17 pages
In the following essay, Jones finds similarities between cyberpunk and the period of English Romanticism. When St Paul's and Westminster Abbey shall stand, shapeless and nameless ruins, in the ... Read more
5,423 words, approx. 19 pages
In the following essay, Hantke examines a subgenre of science fiction called “steampunk,” which rewrites and reinterprets events in the Victorian period. In the introduction to The Other... Read more
7,631 words, approx. 26 pages
In the following essay, Springer explores images of sexuality and technology in cyberpunk fiction. One thing is certain: the riddle of mind, long a topic for philosophers, has taken on new urgency. Un... Read more
8,571 words, approx. 29 pages
In the following essay, Morton examines homosexuality in postmodern and cyberpunk theory. In today's dominant, “post-al” academy, the widely celebrated “advance” in ... Read more
9,511 words, approx. 32 pages
In the following essay, Foster examines the implications of disembodied sexuality in cyberpunk culture. You are seduced by the sex appeal of the inorganic. —Barbara Kruger The computer takes u... Read more
6,187 words, approx. 21 pages
In the following essay, Whalen explores the cyberpunk notion of “information” and its place in post-industrial society. Imagine an alien … who's come here to identify the p... Read more
10,244 words, approx. 35 pages
In the following interview, Shiner and McCaffery discuss cyberpunk, skatepunk, and post-industrialism. You can't sit around and cry because they cut down some trees and pave everything. Concret... Read more
7,454 words, approx. 25 pages
In the following essay, Sponsler discusses dystopic predictions in cyberpunk. For better or for worse, “cyberpunk” no longer needs much introduction. Used as commonly and casually as its... Read more
6,156 words, approx. 21 pages
In the following essay, Schmitt discusses William Gibson's mythologizing of technology in his fiction. With only three published novels and a collection of short stories, William Gibson has qui... Read more
4,296 words, approx. 15 pages
In the following essay, Jones discusses cyberpunk's place in the “information marketplace.” What is it you're after? Uh, information? Oh. Another one. Life was simple bef... Read more
7,123 words, approx. 24 pages
In the following essay, Moylan examines contradictory views of future sociopolitical events in William Gibson's writing. I In 1990, in his speech to the General Assembly of the United Nations, ... Read more
11,343 words, approx. 38 pages
In the following essay, Springer discusses the social implications of the disembodiment celebrated by cyberpunk. Can thought go on without a body? —Jean-François Lyotard1 When Ren... Read more
2,598 words, approx. 9 pages
In the following essay, Latham reviews Cyberspace/Cyberbodies/Cyberpunk: Cultures of Technological Embodiment and discusses the merging of human and machine known as cyborgs. Simultaneously published ... Read more
767 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following essay, Slade briefly discusses notions about the “technological sublime” in Joseph Tabbi's Postmodern Sublime: Technology and American Writing from Mailer to Cybe... Read more
6,084 words, approx. 21 pages
In the following essay, Bowker reviews several volumes of cyberpunk theory and maintains that the writing of cyberspace has global social significance. What is this thing called cyberspace? According ... Read more
11,968 words, approx. 40 pages
In the following essay, McHale delineates the relationship between the “postmodernist poetics of fiction and cyberpunk poetics.” Cyberpunk science fiction is clearly on the postmodernist... Read more
6,049 words, approx. 21 pages
In the following review, Foster analyzes Cyberspace/Cyberbodies/Cyberpunk: Cultures of Technological Embodiment and Virtual Realities and Their Discontents, in terms of rhetorical and ideative content... Read more
2,302 words, approx. 8 pages
In the following essay, which was originally published in 1988, Maddox provides a thematic overview of Sterling's Mechanist/Shaper stories. Cyberpunk, science fiction's new movement of t... Read more
13,214 words, approx. 45 pages
In the following essay, Foster analyzes the predominance of “themes of gender and sexual performativity or cross-identification in these narratives about cyberspace.” What we have in tod... Read more
7,235 words, approx. 25 pages
In the following essay, Hollinger views cyberpunk in its relation to postmodernism, genre science fiction, and literary realism. If, as Fredric Jameson has argued, postmodernism is our contemporary cu... Read more
711 words, approx. 3 pages
Through years of advancements in the world, technology has become greatest aspect. The development of technology by incorporating the human mind and culture has brought about a new era. These are the... Read more
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