Ciarán Carson Summary

Everything you need to understand or teach Ciarán Carson.

  • 29 Literature Criticisms
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The Ciarn Carson Study Pack contains about 150 pages of study material in 29 products, including:

Essays & Analysis (29)

648 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following excerpt, Wills describes how Carson demonstrates the connection between violence and language in The Irish for No. The use of physical force and verbal persuasion are at opposite ends... Read more
7,769 words, approx. 26 pages
In the following essay, Batten explains the Irish concept of “crack” and how Carson employs it in Belfast Confetti. The room was suddenly rich and the great bay-window was Spawning snow ... Read more
560 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following review, Craig describes how Carson writes about more than Irish traditional music in Last Night's Fun. There is a traditional Irish tune called “Last Night's Fun&... Read more
1,030 words, approx. 4 pages
In the following review, Norfolk argues that Carson's Opera et Cetera exhibits impressive verbal virtuosity, but in the end seems gratuitous. Ciaran Carson's fourth collection [Opera et ... Read more
831 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following review, Eder argues that Carson's digressions and reminiscences are the heart of his Last Night's Fun. The places in this evocation of musical Ireland [found in Last Nig... Read more
752 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following review, Madigan lauds Carson's look at the traditional world of Irish music in Last Night's Fun. There are good sessions and bad sessions in Irish music, and it doesn&#x... Read more
791 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following review, Nicholson concludes that, despite the lack of a Gaelic glossary, Carson's Last Night's Fun is an “otherwise delightful read.” “I cannot fix ... Read more
2,130 words, approx. 8 pages
In the following review, Donoghue asserts that the best parts of Carson's The Star Factory are those that look nostalgically at the past. I made my first visit to Belfast when I was almost 11, ... Read more
680 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following review, Eagleton discusses how Carson's The Star Factory represents the next step in the literature of Northern Ireland. The fascination that Belfast has for its inhabitants ne... Read more
718 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following review, Hitchings provides an unfavorable assessment of Carson's The Star Factory. If Dublin disappeared, it could be reconstructed from the detail stored up in James Joyce�... Read more
422 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following excerpt, Wiman analyzes Carson's style in Opera et Cetera. Though Ciaran Carson's poems are […] weakened by a style which seems less a necessity than a handy mean... Read more
2,830 words, approx. 10 pages
In the following excerpt, Drexel provides a brief survey of contemporary Irish poetry and details how Carson's work relates to it. Fifty years after his death, Yeats's influence on Irish... Read more
4,325 words, approx. 15 pages
In the following essay, Howard traces the gradual inward movement of Carson's poetry, culminating in Opera et Cetera. Among the leading writers of Northern Ireland, no one is more protean than ... Read more
8,577 words, approx. 29 pages
In the following essay, Kerrigan compares the poetry of Seamus Heaney to that of Carson. In the human geography of these islands, diversity is the rule. Plainly, however, there are regions in which th... Read more
809 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following excerpt, D'Aulaire asserts that music is the unifying theme of Carson's Last Night's Fun, but that the book is really about much more. Purportedly about Irish mus... Read more
595 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following review, Pratt concludes that Carson took a big risk with The Star Factory and failed. A Ulysses for Belfast? Ciaran Carson tries hard to make it work, but he isn't Joyce and Be... Read more
851 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following review, MacFarlane discusses the structure and language of Carson's Fishing for Amber. Judging a book by its cover is generally agreed to be bad behaviour. But what about by it... Read more
534 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following review, Carr-Gomm praises Carson's Shamrock Tea as “a highly seductive book.” Shamrock Tea is a heady brew, both as a book and as a drink. This is a tale that doe... Read more
987 words, approx. 4 pages
In the following review, Dart argues that the catholicity of Carson's Shamrock Tea is both the novel's greatest strength and its greatest weakness. Jan van Eyck's “Arnolfin... Read more
694 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following review, Murphy notes that the reader will fall under Carson's spell in Shamrock Tea, even though the book never comes to much of a conclusion. Go back in history to the time of... Read more
344 words, approx. 2 pages
In the following review, Reale lauds Carson's Shamrock Tea and points out that it is the novel's journey, not its destination, that matters. Smoke it or drink it; the effects are the sam... Read more
1,015 words, approx. 4 pages
In the following review, O'Brien praises Carson's translation of Dante Alighieri's Inferno, noting the “sustained energy and ingenuity” of his adaptation. In the int... Read more
943 words, approx. 4 pages
In the following excerpt, Ford argues that Carson establishes a particular political context in The Irish for No. [The Irish for No] is Ciaran Carson's second collection of poems. His first, Th... Read more
638 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following excerpt, Lucas praises Carson's Belfast Confetti. There's so much going on in Ciaran Carson's new volume [Belfast Confetti] that it's impossible to do more... Read more
1,351 words, approx. 5 pages
In the following review, Corcoran discusses Carson's style in Belfast Confetti. Ciaran Carson's last book, The Irish for No, published in 1987, was one of the most warmly received volume... Read more
966 words, approx. 4 pages
In the following review, Howard concludes that Carson's exploration of Belfast in Belfast Confetti is compelling. “All poets adore explosions,” wrote Auden in “The Poet &#x... Read more
678 words, approx. 3 pages
In the following review, Glover explores how Carson uses language in First Language. The award of the first T. S. Eliot Prize for the poetry book of the year was, as one of the hot and overwrought mul... Read more
1,218 words, approx. 5 pages
In the following review, Wills concludes that Carson's First Language is disappointing because the musicality of the language is overshadowed by the collection's larger intentions. The f... Read more
1,184 words, approx. 4 pages
In the following review, Bedient notes that the poems in Carson's First Language are uneven. In First Language, which won the T. S. Eliot Poetry Prize for the outstanding book of poetry publish... Read more