Antebellum Summary

Everything you need to understand or teach Antebellum.

  • 23 Literature Criticisms
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Study Pack

The Antebellum Study Pack contains:

Essays & Analysis (23)

8,491 words, approx. 29 pages
In the following essay, Page discusses the paucity of a truly Southern literature prior to the Civil War and summarizes the principal Southern novelists, short story writers, and poets of the antebell... Read more
5,913 words, approx. 20 pages
In the following essay, Degler outlines the economic and historical sources of Southern cultural distinctiveness, maintaining nonetheless that differences between Northerners and Southerners in the fi... Read more
9,481 words, approx. 32 pages
In the following excerpt, Ridgely observes myth-making qualities in the novels of the Old South—romantic works that elaborate themes of Southern uniqueness, manifest destiny, and separatism. Th... Read more
5,751 words, approx. 20 pages
In the following essay, Bakker probes John Pendleton Kennedy's subtle critique of the pastoral ideal in Swallow Barn and his subsequent reaffirmation of this myth in Horse-Shoe Robinson. An Ame... Read more
7,339 words, approx. 25 pages
In the following essay, Kreyling highlights the typical adherence of the antebellum novel to the conventions of heroic romance. We lack a tradition in the arts; more to the point, we lack a literary t... Read more
7,368 words, approx. 25 pages
In the following essay, Bakker traces the pattern of pastoral and anti-pastoral impulses in four narrative romances of the Old South.         &#... Read more
9,388 words, approx. 32 pages
In the following excerpt, Gray studies the antebellum novels of William Gilmore Simms and his contemporaries as they valorize the South while occasionally depicting the region as slowly but continuous... Read more
5,920 words, approx. 20 pages
In the following essay, Watson illuminates William Gilmore Simms's comparison of Revolutionary America with the antebellum South in his novels of the 1850s and 1860s. In the first part of his c... Read more
4,411 words, approx. 15 pages
In the following essay, Bakker emphasizes Caroline Lee Hentz's and E. D. E. N. Southworth's manipulation of conventional sentimental devices in their early romances for the purpose of di... Read more
9,987 words, approx. 34 pages
In the following essay, Scott documents the dissatisfaction of many Southern women with the restrictive roles assigned to them in the Old South. Open complaint about their lot was not the custom among... Read more
5,756 words, approx. 20 pages
In the following essay, originally delivered as an address in 1908, Smith surveys a number of enduring poems by minor pre-Civil War poets and analyzes the reasons for the lack of literary productivene... Read more
4,762 words, approx. 16 pages
In the following essay, Bakker explores the theme of hesitant or repressed rebellion by women in the writings of Caroline Lee Hentz, Caroline Gilman, and Eliza Ann Dupuy. In the romances of the female... Read more
3,512 words, approx. 12 pages
In the following essay, Woodell describes three unusual novels by the little-known Charleston writer F. Colburn Adams that attack Southern hypocrisy and the institution of slavery. Francis Colburn Ada... Read more
6,065 words, approx. 21 pages
In the following essay, Hedin concentrates on the new literary strategies of nineteenth-century slave narratives which grafted morality, political awareness, and irony to the simpler, eighteenth-centu... Read more
5,253 words, approx. 18 pages
In the following essay, Doherty comments on Harriet Jacobs's skilled application of the narrative conventions of the popular sentimental novel to her Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl. In 1... Read more
9,808 words, approx. 33 pages
In the following essay, Yarborough contends that Frederick Douglass's reinterpretation and exaltation of a slave rebellion in his novella The Heroic Slave is subverted by the underlying prejudi... Read more
6,754 words, approx. 23 pages
In the following essay, Cotterill disparagingly assesses the writing of the Old South, from newspaper journalism to fiction. It is more than probable that in the field of literature the people of the ... Read more
2,110 words, approx. 8 pages
In the following excerpt, Holman stresses the economic and cultural grounds for the dearth of accomplished Southern literature during the years 1800 to 1865, seeing Edgar Allan Poe, William Gilmore Si... Read more
9,066 words, approx. 31 pages
In the following essay, Simpson considers the development of the myth of the Old South as a spiritually redemptive community. The Civil War, Richard M. Weaver says in his essay entitled “The So... Read more
4,639 words, approx. 16 pages
In the following essay, Werner presents an overview of early nineteenth-century Southern literature, arguing that the Old South played a crucial role in the cultural growth of the fledgling United Sta... Read more
6,840 words, approx. 23 pages
In the following essay, Wimsatt surveys the mostly romantic prose fiction of the pre-Civil War American South. Antebellum Americans, especially in the South, relished the popular romance as it had dev... Read more
7,223 words, approx. 25 pages
In the following essay, Thompson contrasts the typically regional focus of nineteenth-century Southern writers with that of Edgar Allan Poe, whose work consistently transcends the literary tropes and ... Read more
7,645 words, approx. 26 pages
In the following essay, Cardwell presents the subject of dueling as an important element in the “aristocratic” culture of the Old South, one frequently treated by writers of the period. ... Read more