Abbey Theatre Summary

Everything you need to understand or teach Abbey Theatre.

  • 16 Literature Criticisms
Follow Us on Facebook

Study Pack

The Abbey Theatre Study Pack contains:

Essays & Analysis (16)

1,024 words, approx. 4 pages
In the following interview, originally published in 1910, one of the founders of the Abbey Theatre discusses the peasant plays of the Abbey Theatre as part of a dramatic movement “that is repre... Read more
7,525 words, approx. 26 pages
In the following essay, McDiarmid argues that three early controversies—the censorship of Shaw's The Shewing-Up of Blanco Posnet, the American response to Synge's Playboy, and the... Read more
3,560 words, approx. 12 pages
In the following essay, Kavanagh describes Yeats's interest in producing poetic works and the Catholic Church's suspicions of the Abbey's early plays. During the early years of th... Read more
6,219 words, approx. 21 pages
In the following essay, Miller—a stage designer—discusses the “pioneering work in stage design” that occurred at the Abbey Theatre during the Irish Literary Renaissance. Am... Read more
10,609 words, approx. 36 pages
In the following essay, Flannery considers the political context in which the Abbey was established, focusing particularly on conflicts about the artistic vision the Abbey was to follow. 1902-1905: th... Read more
9,388 words, approx. 32 pages
In the following essay, Hunt—the director of the Abbey Theatre from 1935 to 1971—recounts the plays performed in the early years of the Irish Free State, which was formed in 1923 as a re... Read more
7,497 words, approx. 25 pages
In the following essay, Saddlemyer discusses contemporary artistic and political reactions to the poetic and peasant plays produced by the Abbey Theatre during the early years of the Irish Literary Re... Read more
7,197 words, approx. 24 pages
In the following historically-grounded essay, Dalsimer argues that the Abbey's American tours between 1911 and 1914 (at the height of the Irish Literary Renaissance) and between 1931-1938 conso... Read more
1,796 words, approx. 6 pages
In the following essay, first published in The Irish Statesman on January 2, 1926, Russell, an important figure in the Irish Literary Renaissance who signed his poetry with the initials “A. E.,... Read more
5,968 words, approx. 20 pages
In the following essay, McClintock explores Yeats's changing attitudes toward the Irish language as a nationalist who insisted on “art over politics.” The author argues that Yeats... Read more
6,400 words, approx. 22 pages
In the following essay, originally given at the first Abbey Theatre Dramatic Festival in 1938, Malone recounts the early history of the Abbey Theatre. Conscious as I am of the great compliment which h... Read more
1,482 words, approx. 5 pages
In the following essay, originally published in 1947, Fay, one of the original actors at the Abbey Theatre along with his brother, Frank Fay, provides his personal impressions of the founding of the A... Read more
2,476 words, approx. 9 pages
In the following essay, first delivered as a speech for the first Abbey Theatre Dramatic Festival in 1938, Robinson—who served as a manager, producer, and director at the Abbey Theatre—d... Read more
5,789 words, approx. 20 pages
In the following essay, Ayling examines the complicated relationship of playwright Sean O'Casey to the Abbey Theatre. “All art is a collaboration” J. M. Synge1 I Irish writers an... Read more
2,876 words, approx. 10 pages
In the following essay, Saddlemyer discusses an unpublished essay by John Millington Synge that demonstrates Synge's commitment to Yeats's artistic principles and the ideals of the early... Read more
4,062 words, approx. 14 pages
In the following essay, Gooddie examines the complicated and thorny relationship between Yeats and Annie Horniman, the first financial backer of the Abbey Theatre. In 1904 local authorities started to... Read more